June 27

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Dachau, Germany

Friday morning we got up and went to the Dachau concentration camp memorial. This we rescheduled from Wednesday afternoon. Dachau is about a 30-minute train ride and 10-minute bus ride outside of Munich. All of original buildings are still there, with the exception of the prisoner’s barracks. Only two of the 30 were restored…the rest were too dilapidated and were torn down, now just filled with rock beds where the foundations once stood. The inside of the main building serves as the museum, and tastefully tells the history behind the Nazi movement, and carefully portrays the horrendous things that happened here during the Holocaust.
This was a sobering experience, and it was painful to imagine a family arriving through the gates of the camp, being separated, and not knowing if they would see one another again.
The rest of Friday is a travel day by train to Saverne, France (just outside of Strasbourg) where will stay in a couple’s home; he was raised in the States and moved to France after he married. His father attends our church in Goshen, and helped us make the connection. I arranged for this home stay while Steve was visiting his father in Goshen back in April.
Most of the historic science sites have been checked off the list, so that part of the trip is feeling complete. The last two big items on the list were a meeting room in Karlsruhe, and the German Pharmacy Museum inside Heidelberg Castle. These are on the agenda for Saturday, before a cruise down the Rhine River on Sunday. The visit to Karlsruhe may get scratched; it is just a meeting room in a non-descript building with no plaque or commemoration. It is the site of the Karlsruhe Conference in 1927 that brought together some of the prominent chemists of the time. The business of the Karlsruhe Congress led to common terminology, symbols, and other standards in chemical nomenclature. It would eventually lead to the formation of the International Union of a pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), the international authority on chemical nomenclature, structures, and symbols.
There may be one final science stop on Sunday or Monday, but we will have to see how the schedule holds up. We’re still trying to get back on our itinerary after the cascade of problems caused by train service in the Czech Republic earlier this week.

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